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Bolivia’s Morales under fresh pressure from unions

Today (29 June) a 72-hour national strike called by Bolivia’s main workers’ union, Central Obrera Boliviana (COB), will begin.

Colombian peace deal within touching distance

The end of the world’s longest running armed conflict is within sight. Colombia’s President Juan Manuel Santos is attending a ceremony in Cuba as we go to press to sign an accord with the maximum leader of the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (Farc), ‘Timochenko’ (Rodrigo Londoño Echeverri), to implement a definitive bilateral ceasefire and guerrilla disarmament and demobilisation. This is a major advance and prompted Santos to take the risk of setting another deadline for the completion of peace negotiations. The new date is 20 July. Some outstanding issues need to be resolved, but Santos has already moved on to discussing a referendum on the final accord, warning that failure to approve it would see the Farc return to urban attacks and increased taxes to finance the cost of the war. Supporters and opponents alike condemned his remarks.

First outlines of a new economic policy in Brazil

Michel Temer was sworn in as Brazil’s acting president on 12 May, after the Senate voted to begin an impeachment trial of the previous incumbent, Dilma Rousseff. The trial could take up to 180 days. Theoretically, Rousseff could return to the top job at some point during that period if she is found innocent of the charge that she manipulated the fiscal accounts. In political terms, the most likely outcome is that Temer will serve out the rest of her term in office, until the next general election due in October 2018. So for the next two years plus, economic policy is likely to be in the hands of the new president and his just-appointed finance minister, Henrique Meirelles. Investors are asking what this is likely to mean for Latin America’s largest economy.

Will the ELN be a spanner in the works?

Less than two months after 30 March, the day on which the Colombian government and the country’s second-largest left-wing guerrilla group, the Ejército Nacional de Liberación (ELN), announced a six-point agenda for peace talks, progress appears to have ground to a halt. In the worst-case scenario, failure to engage the ELN could threaten the wider peace settlement, and undermine the progress made so far in talks with the largest rebel movement, the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC).

More cracks at the top as Bachelet loses another interior minister

This month Chile’s President Michelle Bachelet was forced to replace her interior minister, Jorge Burgos, after he quit citing “personal reasons”. The departure of Burgos – Bachelet’s second interior minister since she took office in March 2014 – follows other signs of crisis in the Nueva Mayoría coalition government, which remains deeply unpopular due to various corruption scandals implicating the political and business establishment alike; its perceived foot-dragging on electoral pledges such as education reform; and its failure to effectively address the domestic economic slowdown.

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LatinNews
Intelligence Research Ltd.
Hamilton House, Fourth Floor
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Bloomsbury
London
WC1H 9BB
UK


Phone: +44 (0)203 695 2790+44 (0)203 695 2790

Terms and conditions

CONTACT

You may contact us via our online contact form,
or write to us at:

LatinNews
Intelligence Research Ltd.
Hamilton House, Fourth Floor
Mabledon Place
Bloomsbury
London
WC1H 9BB
UK


Phone: +44 (0)203 695 2790+44 (0)203 695 2790

Terms and conditions

Upcoming Conferences

No events





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 Join Us

Member Area

Bolivia’s Morales under fresh pressure from unions

Today (29 June) a 72-hour national strike called by Bolivia’s main workers’ union, Central Obrera Boliviana (COB), will begin.

Colombian peace deal within touching distance

The end of the world’s longest running armed conflict is within sight. Colombia’s President Juan Manuel Santos is attending a ceremony in Cuba as we go to press to sign an accord with the maximum leader of the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (Farc), ‘Timochenko’ (Rodrigo Londoño Echeverri), to implement a definitive bilateral ceasefire and guerrilla disarmament and demobilisation. This is a major advance and prompted Santos to take the risk of setting another deadline for the completion of peace negotiations. The new date is 20 July. Some outstanding issues need to be resolved, but Santos has already moved on to discussing a referendum on the final accord, warning that failure to approve it would see the Farc return to urban attacks and increased taxes to finance the cost of the war. Supporters and opponents alike condemned his remarks.

First outlines of a new economic policy in Brazil

Michel Temer was sworn in as Brazil’s acting president on 12 May, after the Senate voted to begin an impeachment trial of the previous incumbent, Dilma Rousseff. The trial could take up to 180 days. Theoretically, Rousseff could return to the top job at some point during that period if she is found innocent of the charge that she manipulated the fiscal accounts. In political terms, the most likely outcome is that Temer will serve out the rest of her term in office, until the next general election due in October 2018. So for the next two years plus, economic policy is likely to be in the hands of the new president and his just-appointed finance minister, Henrique Meirelles. Investors are asking what this is likely to mean for Latin America’s largest economy.

Will the ELN be a spanner in the works?

Less than two months after 30 March, the day on which the Colombian government and the country’s second-largest left-wing guerrilla group, the Ejército Nacional de Liberación (ELN), announced a six-point agenda for peace talks, progress appears to have ground to a halt. In the worst-case scenario, failure to engage the ELN could threaten the wider peace settlement, and undermine the progress made so far in talks with the largest rebel movement, the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC).

More cracks at the top as Bachelet loses another interior minister

This month Chile’s President Michelle Bachelet was forced to replace her interior minister, Jorge Burgos, after he quit citing “personal reasons”. The departure of Burgos – Bachelet’s second interior minister since she took office in March 2014 – follows other signs of crisis in the Nueva Mayoría coalition government, which remains deeply unpopular due to various corruption scandals implicating the political and business establishment alike; its perceived foot-dragging on electoral pledges such as education reform; and its failure to effectively address the domestic economic slowdown.

Upcoming Conferences

No events





More Conferences

 

CONTACT

You may contact us via our online contact form, or write to us at:

LatinNews
Intelligence Research Ltd.
Hamilton House, Fourth Floor
Mabledon Place
Bloomsbury
London
WC1H 9BB
UK


Phone: +44 (0)203 695 2790+44 (0)203 695 2790

Terms and conditions

CONTACT

You may contact us via our online contact form,
or write to us at:

LatinNews
Intelligence Research Ltd.
Hamilton House, Fourth Floor
Mabledon Place
Bloomsbury
London
WC1H 9BB
UK


Phone: +44 (0)203 695 2790+44 (0)203 695 2790

Terms and conditions

Upcoming Conferences

No events





More Conferences