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Taped coup plot deals blow to Temer government

On 23 May Brazil’s planning minister, Romero Jucá, stood down following the publication of a tape suggesting that the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff was motivated by a desire to stop corruption investigations implicating various prominent Brazilian politicians.

Opposition dismay as Maduro decrees national state of exception

While some in the Venezuelan opposition like to disparage President Nicolás Maduro as ‘the bus driver’ and mock his awkward efforts to ape the ways of his late predecessor, Hugo Chávez (1999-2013), Maduro, or at least those around him, learned one lesson well from the comandante: always to stay one step ahead of the enemy. The national state of exception decreed by Maduro on Friday 13 May was a dramatic but all too predictable move, as the Bolivarian government makes full use of the considerable legal means at its disposal. But with patience on the ground fraying fast, there is mounting concern, not only in the US, that Venezuela is heading for a potentially chaotic social reckoning.

First outlines of a new economic policy in Brazil

Michel Temer was sworn in as Brazil’s acting president on 12 May, after the Senate voted to begin an impeachment trial of the previous incumbent, Dilma Rousseff. The trial could take up to 180 days. Theoretically, Rousseff could return to the top job at some point during that period if she is found innocent of the charge that she manipulated the fiscal accounts. In political terms, the most likely outcome is that Temer will serve out the rest of her term in office, until the next general election due in October 2018. So for the next two years plus, economic policy is likely to be in the hands of the new president and his just-appointed finance minister, Henrique Meirelles. Investors are asking what this is likely to mean for Latin America’s largest economy.

Changes in the murder count

Last year Honduras and El Salvador swapped places near the top of the world’s ranking of counties with the highest homicide rates. The murder rate has gone down sharply in Honduras, and surged almost as sharply in El Salvador. Although there are a number of factors at work, there is as yet no definitive explanation for this reversal of fortune.

Medina secures re-election but opposition also fares well

The Dominican Republic (DR)’s President Danilo Medina has become the first president to secure consecutive re-election since this was allowed under the changes introduced last year to the 2010 constitution thanks to a deal between the ruling centre-left Partido de la Liberación Dominicana (PLD) and its traditional rival, the leftist Partido Revolucionario Dominicano (PRD) [RC-15-06]. Medina, whose re-election bid was also backed by the PRD, obtained over 60% of the votes cast in the 15 May general elections. Yet the newly formed opposition party Partido Revolucionario Moderno (PRM) delivered a strong performance in its electoral debut with its presidential candidate, Luis Abinader, receiving a respectable 35% and the party set to win many congressional and municipal seats, consolidating itself as the main opposition party.

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LatinNews
Intelligence Research Ltd.
Hamilton House, Fourth Floor
Mabledon Place
Bloomsbury
London
WC1H 9BB
UK


Phone: +44 (0)203 695 2790+44 (0)203 695 2790

Terms and conditions

CONTACT

You may contact us via our online contact form,
or write to us at:

LatinNews
Intelligence Research Ltd.
Hamilton House, Fourth Floor
Mabledon Place
Bloomsbury
London
WC1H 9BB
UK


Phone: +44 (0)203 695 2790+44 (0)203 695 2790

Terms and conditions

Upcoming Conferences

No events





More Conferences

 
 Join Us

Member Area

Taped coup plot deals blow to Temer government

On 23 May Brazil’s planning minister, Romero Jucá, stood down following the publication of a tape suggesting that the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff was motivated by a desire to stop corruption investigations implicating various prominent Brazilian politicians.

Opposition dismay as Maduro decrees national state of exception

While some in the Venezuelan opposition like to disparage President Nicolás Maduro as ‘the bus driver’ and mock his awkward efforts to ape the ways of his late predecessor, Hugo Chávez (1999-2013), Maduro, or at least those around him, learned one lesson well from the comandante: always to stay one step ahead of the enemy. The national state of exception decreed by Maduro on Friday 13 May was a dramatic but all too predictable move, as the Bolivarian government makes full use of the considerable legal means at its disposal. But with patience on the ground fraying fast, there is mounting concern, not only in the US, that Venezuela is heading for a potentially chaotic social reckoning.

First outlines of a new economic policy in Brazil

Michel Temer was sworn in as Brazil’s acting president on 12 May, after the Senate voted to begin an impeachment trial of the previous incumbent, Dilma Rousseff. The trial could take up to 180 days. Theoretically, Rousseff could return to the top job at some point during that period if she is found innocent of the charge that she manipulated the fiscal accounts. In political terms, the most likely outcome is that Temer will serve out the rest of her term in office, until the next general election due in October 2018. So for the next two years plus, economic policy is likely to be in the hands of the new president and his just-appointed finance minister, Henrique Meirelles. Investors are asking what this is likely to mean for Latin America’s largest economy.

Changes in the murder count

Last year Honduras and El Salvador swapped places near the top of the world’s ranking of counties with the highest homicide rates. The murder rate has gone down sharply in Honduras, and surged almost as sharply in El Salvador. Although there are a number of factors at work, there is as yet no definitive explanation for this reversal of fortune.

Medina secures re-election but opposition also fares well

The Dominican Republic (DR)’s President Danilo Medina has become the first president to secure consecutive re-election since this was allowed under the changes introduced last year to the 2010 constitution thanks to a deal between the ruling centre-left Partido de la Liberación Dominicana (PLD) and its traditional rival, the leftist Partido Revolucionario Dominicano (PRD) [RC-15-06]. Medina, whose re-election bid was also backed by the PRD, obtained over 60% of the votes cast in the 15 May general elections. Yet the newly formed opposition party Partido Revolucionario Moderno (PRM) delivered a strong performance in its electoral debut with its presidential candidate, Luis Abinader, receiving a respectable 35% and the party set to win many congressional and municipal seats, consolidating itself as the main opposition party.

Upcoming Conferences

No events





More Conferences

 

CONTACT

You may contact us via our online contact form, or write to us at:

LatinNews
Intelligence Research Ltd.
Hamilton House, Fourth Floor
Mabledon Place
Bloomsbury
London
WC1H 9BB
UK


Phone: +44 (0)203 695 2790+44 (0)203 695 2790

Terms and conditions

CONTACT

You may contact us via our online contact form,
or write to us at:

LatinNews
Intelligence Research Ltd.
Hamilton House, Fourth Floor
Mabledon Place
Bloomsbury
London
WC1H 9BB
UK


Phone: +44 (0)203 695 2790+44 (0)203 695 2790

Terms and conditions

Upcoming Conferences

No events





More Conferences