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Indigenous Politics

The state of indigenous politics in Latin America
For centuries the experience of many indigenous groups in Latin America has been one of resistance...
Brazil is home to around 900,000 indigenous people belonging to more than 300 different ethnic groups, according to the 2010 census, which have long struggled to protect their interests from those who think they hold back the economic development of the country...
Bolivia is an outlier, as the country has been ruled by indigenous President Evo Morales since 2006...
Chile has a had a historically complicated relationship with its indigenous groups, which number nine in total...
Home to one of the most emblematic indigenous political movements in Latin America, Mexico has nonetheless struggled to make much headway in improving conditions for its indigenous population...
Indigenous groups in Guatemala face many of the same structural problems that affect similar groups in other Latin American nations, but their case is particularly interesting given the relative size of the indigenous population and the effects of civil war...
In this section we feature highlights of interviews with three experts in indigenous politics: Dr Roberta Rice (RR), associate professor in political science at the University of Calgary; Dr Natividad Gutierrez Chong (NGC), a sociologist at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México; and Manuel Martinez Espinosa (MME), a political scientist at the Universidad de Ciencias y Artes de Chiapas...
The panorama for indigenous rights in Latin America is complex, and it would be wrong to conclude with pan-regional generalisations...

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